Lost Corner Farm

Restorative, sustainable, natural.

Welcome to Lost Corner Farm of Leesburg, Virginia, a traditional, sustainable farming operation producing high quality, flavorful fruits and vegetables found in local farm markets, businesses, and on the tables of community members. Some of the places you can find our produce include Mom's Apple Pie Bakery, in their pies and quiche as well as for sale in their retail shops when in season; at Potomac Vegetable Farms' Vienna market and CSA shares; at Cultured: Tasteful Frozen Yogurt... and Soup! in a variety of soups during colder months and as toppings for their real frozen yogurt during late spring and summer.

We are happy to offer our CSA share for the 2017 growing season and look forward to providing you and your family with some of the best farm-fresh food in the area.  Our riverside fields produce truly beautiful, flavorful, and nutritious fruits and veggies... and bountifully! 

 

 

Fall 2014 Weekly Farm Updates - October 8th

This week our members are enjoying the following fresh produce:

  • Tomatoes
  • Cherry Tomatoes
  • Yukon Gold Potatoes
  • Rose Gold Potatoes
  • Fingerling Potatoes
  • Bell Peppers
  • Summer Squash
  • Winter Squash (Kabocha & Butternut)
  • Red & Yellow Raspberries
  • Garden of Eden pole beans
  • Fortex pole beans
  • Eggplant
  • Red Russian, Dinosaur & Tuscano Kale

Man is the farm lovely this time of year. Some days, I can barely convince myself to leave. With the pumpkins coloring the landscape, and lots of fresh, plowed fields holding the promise of next year’s bounty, there’s beauty as far as the eye can see. 

And speaking of next year, I spent some time in the strawberry patches with Steven this week. The plants went in the ground in early September, and they’re already happily sending out runners and putting out berries. I was amazed to learn that our little pals were stored at 29° after being boxed up at the berry nursery, so that they would keep all summer long before we planted them this fall. I would have assumed that freezing them would kill them, but I love learning how very wrong I can be about things on the farm. 

The beautiful Strawberry patch

The beautiful Strawberry patch

A sweet reminder that before we know it, it will be spring again

A sweet reminder that before we know it, it will be spring again

Even though we are enjoying snacking on the sweet strawberries, we don’t want the plants to put too much energy into fruiting and runners, so we’ll be snipping those off so they can store their energy up for the winter. It won’t be long now before we put them to bed, all snuggled up under their row cover blankets, to wait out the colder months, until they can really do their thing this spring. 

Steven has a friend in Europe who recommended a certain strawberry variety to try out, so it will be fun to see what happens with this tiny part of the patch. Fingers crossed, the experiment will go well, but of course we won’t know for quite some time. 

That more sparse area on the right is the European row

That more sparse area on the right is the European row

The crew is still working hard picking raspberries, digging potatoes, and combing the tomato rows for any last holdouts, but this week they to turned their attention to picking pumpkins. I ran down to the fields to get in on the fun, but the truth is, most of these pumpkins are so heavy, I can barely lift them. I’ve had my eye on a 60 lb polar bear pumpkin for a while, and I finally convinced Ryan to load it in the back of my Jeep yesterday. I have to say, it must have been a very amusing sight watching me heave it into a wheel barrow from my car once I got home. I wasn’t laughing, but I’m sure any witnesses, had their been any, would have been. 

Our motley crew, just after loading up the van 

Our motley crew, just after loading up the van 

A pumpkin avalanche, just waiting to happen

A pumpkin avalanche, just waiting to happen

The crew effortlessly tossed the pumpkins to Chris & Ryan as they loaded them into the bakery van, which we christened in the fields for the first time, and then Ryan headed off to Mom’s Apple Pie in Leesburg to pile them up for sale at the shop. I can’t wait to see how cute they look outside that charming little building! 

I couldn't help but jump in for a picture, even though I barely helped at all! 

I couldn't help but jump in for a picture, even though I barely helped at all! 

Fall 2014 Weekly Farm Updates - October 1st

Week 20 — I honestly cannot believe how quickly this season has flown by; just two more baskets after tomorrow. I sincerely hope that everyone has enjoyed everything we have lovingly grown, picked and packed up. It’s been a trying year, for many reasons, but a wonderful one above all else. 

Our members are enjoying the following fresh produce in their shares:

  • Fortex pole beans
  • Garden of Eden beans
  • Lima Beans
  • Red & Yellow Raspberries
  • Mixed bundle Red Russian & Dinosaur Kale
  • Sweet Potatoes
  • Fingerling Potatoes
  • Rose Gold Potatoes
  • Tomatoes
  • Cherry Tomatoes
  • Lunchbox Peppers
  • Bell Peppers
  • Winter Squash (Butternut, Kabocha & Acorn)
  • Jalapeños
  • Carrots
  • Okra

This week there are some exciting additions to our shares. I’m thrilled that the butternut squashes have finally ripened enough to send them out, as they are my favorite! We still have more Kabocha’s & other squashes ripening in the field, so don’t fret, there's more where that came from. There is so much that you can do with this delicious fall staple, from soups, to roasting, to sautéing, to pies, it’s a seriously versatile winter squash. I love it any way I can get it! 

Gorgeous winter squashes, fresh from the fields

Gorgeous winter squashes, fresh from the fields

We're also sharing the first of the cured sweet potatoes this week. They'll find anywhere from one to three inside their burlap bags, as these guys ranged in size from pygmy to ginormous. The ginormous tubers will end up in our sweet potato pies, as trust me, you just wouldn’t even know what to do with them, but the rest I attempted to divvy up as evenly as I could. We were really hoping to have loads and loads of these guys to go around, but if you’ll remember back to our potato problems, we’re happy to have any at all. So mash them, french fry them, roast them or bake them, but please, do savor them. 

It’s tough to tell, but let me give you some perspective — the sweet potato on the bottom is a healthy size potato, about 6 inches long, so you can only imagine how big the big guy is! 

It’s tough to tell, but let me give you some perspective — the sweet potato on the bottom is a healthy size potato, about 6 inches long, so you can only imagine how big the big guy is! 

This will most likely be the last week of peppers, both bell and lunchbox, as the nights are cooling down enough to begin to halt their production. I’m bummed to see them go, but all good produce must come to an end, until next year that is. 

Loving these sweet little lunchboxes 

Loving these sweet little lunchboxes 

This week Steven has been working hard to create raised beds around the newest blackberry & raspberry plants. Ultimately he would have done this way back in May, before planting, but as the season and problems progressed, these plants found themselves surrounded in weeds and on even ground. Steven estimates that he created about 10 times more work for himself, having to go back and dig these berry bushes out of their weedy nests, and then build raised beds around them, rather then transplanting them into the already raised soil. Hindsight is always 20/20, but there’s not much we can do about that now. The good news is, they’ll be super happy come next year, and that was the goal regardless. 

Steven's hard work

Steven's hard work

I hope everyone is loving the raspberries as much as we are. I admit, I have to restrain myself from eating too many as I package them up. I check each berry — yes every single berry! — to make sure they don’t have the dreaded spotted winged drosophila in them, so please know that a lot of love and care has gone into getting those delicious treats to your table. 

Red Russian kale

Red Russian kale

Tuscano kale, waiting to be picked by our crew

Tuscano kale, waiting to be picked by our crew

Ryan, working hard to harvest potatoes, while Irwin, his beloved pup, waits patiently to play

Ryan, working hard to harvest potatoes, while Irwin, his beloved pup, waits patiently to play